Pita Bread

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Ingredients:

  • 1 package of yeast, or quick rising yeast
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 3 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 1 cup lukewarm water


Dissolve yeast in 1/2 cup of warm water. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Let sit for 10-15 minutes until water is frothy.

Combine flour and salt in large bowl.

Make a small depression in the middle of lour and pur yeast water in depression.

Slowly add 1 cup of warm water, and stir with wooden spoon or rubber spatula until elastic.

Place dough on floured surface and knead for 10-15 minutes. When the dough is no longer stick and is smooth and elastic, it has been successfully kneaded.

Coat large bowl with vegetable oil and place dough in bowl. Turn dough upside down so all of the dough is coated.

Allow to sit in a warm place for about 3 hours, or until it has doubled in size.

Once doubled, roll out in a rope, and pinch off 10-12 small pieces. Place balls on floured surface. Let sit covered for 10 minutes. Preheat oven to 500 deg F. and make sure rack is at the very bottom of oven. Be sure to preheat your baking sheet also.

Roll out each ball of dough with a rolling pin into circles. Each should be about 5-6 inches across and 1/4 inch thick.

Bake each circle for 4 minutes until the bread puffs up. Turn over and bake for 2 minutes.

Remove each pita with a spatula from the baking sheet and add additional pitas for baking.

Take spatula and gently push down puff. Immediately place in storage bags.









This video shows you how to make pita bread and also humus which is the most common dip for pita bread.

History of Pita Bread
Pita bread originated in Egypt and the Middle East centuries ago. It was introduced to the rest of the world by immigrant communities in the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia. Pita bread has been around for thousands of years and is a type of flat bread. The bread is made in a brick bread oven so that there is able to be extremely hot temperatures.In the early centuries of our era, the traditional Greek word for a thin flat bread or cake, plakous, had become the name of a thicker cake. The new word that came into use for flat bread was pitta. The word spread to Southern Italy as the name of a thin bread. In Northern Italian dialects pitta became pizza. Early Arab cookery texts do not refer to khubz, however, it is safe to assume that its history extends far into antiquity, since flat breads in general, whether leavened or not, are among the most ancient breads, needing no oven or even utensil for their baking.

Sources-
http://www.pitapitinternational.com/en/pitabread.php
http://www.combat-aging.com/pita-bread.html
http://www.pitapitinternational.com/en/pitabread.php
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7d_O1BmWyvE